Stephan Thelen – Fractal Guitar [MoonJune 2019]

Stephan Thelen – Fractal Guitar [MoonJune 2019]

Jan 23, 2019 0 By Marcello Nardi
Italian version below

A creature looking at its image, as an ape or a leopard leaning over a pool to drink sees its face and body, sees a dance of matter in time.  But what sees this dance has a memory and expectation, and memory itself is on another plane of time. So each of us walking or sitting or sleeping is at least two scales of time wrapped together like the yolk and the white of an egg (Doris Lessing, Briefing for a Descent into Hell)

Through rhythm we perceive the multiplicity of time. At least two scales, in a constant and unending dialogue, create a rhythm that elicits an elated and dilated sense of time. The dance mentioned by Doris Lessing in Briefing for a Descent into Hell, the novel about the hallucinated journey made by a wayfarer who has gone mad, is a tale of multiple rhythms. As the narration unfolds, the heading below the main title of the book –Briefing for a Descent into Hell. Category: Inner space fiction, for there is never anywhere to go but in- becomes clearer. The main character tells the incredible story of a journey, while sitting in the bed of a sanitarium, with flashbacks and flashforwards that confuse and mock on purpose reader’s sense of time. Stephan Thelen, who named the initial track of his album Fractal Guitar after this novel, plays time in a similar manner. Overlapping metrics create a fractal tapestry of wicked intersections, covering layers over layers of rhythmic figures that collide. Like the wayfarer in the book, he navigates through constantly rippling soundscapes made of repetitive patterns and dense energy that create a sense of dreamlike awakening.

The Zürich based and American born guitarist and mathematician spent the last decade in breeding his project Sonar together with Bernhard Wagner, Christian Kuntner and Manuel Pasquinelli. The Swiss band reached a peak of critical acclaim with last year’s Vortex and Live at Moods, which both hosted David Torn as a fifth band member. Their trademark sound made of tritone-tuned clean guitars knotting over polyrhythmic hypnotic structures was added, better to say enhanced with the ‘+1’ member, who combined their sound with his unique swirling soundscaping palette of sounds. This resulted in opening a new landscape of possibilities, better to say an exponentially growing map of new explorations to embark on. His influence is infectious because he has such a great live energy Stephan Thelen stresses. While the band will meet again later this year to record again with the same four-plus-one line-up, Thelen asked the American guitarist to play on his solo album Fractal Guitar, released on Leonardo Pavkovic‘s label MoonJune.

This time the list of guests was enriched with multiple musicians, making it like a testament of the currently most-regarded avantgarde guitar players. While the list was not made up form the start, it eventually grew as the project evolved: I knew from the start that I wanted to have Markus Reuter on the album because we had talked before about doing something together –says Thelen. I had some pieces I knew they were not ideal for Sonar and I wanted to ask Benno Kaiser to play drums on them. So Markus, Benno and myself, we were the core trio of this projectStephan Thelen worked with touch guitarist Markus Reuter on Falling for Ascension, cobilled to Reuter himself and Sonar. Looking in retrospect, it is quite interesting to look at different directions the band took with Reuter and then with Torn as additional member. But while Falling for Ascension presented music written only by Reuter, this time they were looking at something composed by Stephan Thelen. It all started with drummer Benno Kaiser -again another former collaborator with Thelen, they played together in Radio Osaka and on various of the guitarist’s solo works- providing drums on two tracks and the three of them sending each other their outcomes via internet. It was August 2015 when they started after Stephan Thelen had just came back from a trip to Namibia (by coincidence he was heading off to same country again at the end of the recording process in July 2018). When Benno could no longer continue with the project, I asked my Sonar buddy Manuel to record the remaining drum tracks, knowing that he could nail them down perfectly. Then I went to California, where I met Henry Kaiser and Bill Walker and recorded their tracks in Santa Cruz –recounts Stephan Thelen. I knew Jon Durant from Facebook. He sent me one of his albums and I thought it would be great if he could contribute. I had also met Barry Cleveland in California where I asked him to add some of his sounds on two tracks. It was all very spontaneous and the list of musicians just kept growing. Henry Kaiser was pivotal for him to meet David Torn, who joined a Sonar recording project at the start with the idea to produce the album and ended up playing on all of what then became Vortex. When I was almost finished I knew David was coming to Switzerland and thought of two pieces he could play on. So we booked a studio for a day and recorded his solos and loops. Finally, Matt Tate added all his tracks in Chicago on one evening. The very last thing that was recorded just before the mixing sessions started was Andi Pupato’s percussion on the title track.

Driven by a steady riff by touch guitar, Briefing for a Descent into Hell is built around 3 + 3 + 3 pattern, that Thelen eventually superimposes with polyrhythmic patterns in 5 or other odd measures. Still the track maintains an even mood that feels like a suspended flight over the top of a mountain. While the initial couple of minutes see a multiplication of alternating patterns and riffs that create the intro mood, still there is no lead theme, only the augmentation and fractalization of the main pattern. David Torn enters with occasional sharp and distorted sounds on the higher register, but he highlights the role of soundscape on the bottom more than singing the main melody. The tension grows and gets altered by lots of delays, dialoguing with rhythmic section by Matt Tate at touch guitar and Sonar‘s Manuel Pasquinelli at drums. At around eight minutes and thirty the first stop leaves a few seconds available for a horn-like soundscape to become more visible, until the very first thematic solo of the record is made by Markus Reuter. The second stop, that falls immediately at the end, reveals an odd-signature riff in the style of King Crimson‘s Frame by Frame. Stephan Thelen, who studied in Robert Fripp‘s Guitar Craft Circle and never hided his reverence for King Crimson‘s knotty works such as Fracture, has been hugely influenced by the British master. While Sonar showed his clean-guitar side, more related to the ’80s King Crimson line-up, on the other hand he explored lead guitar effects in his earlier career and also soundscapes that owe a lot to the works Fripp made solo and with the King Crimson. Here it’s like he is finding a balance between two souls of himself. And coming back to the track, it’s again David Torn taking the reins of the song, putting everything back in a frenzied, yet steady state. Stephan Thelen remembers some details about Torn‘s recording session: I asked David to really ‘squeeze the neck’ like a blues guitarist on this one and even played him David Gilmour’s solo from ‘Echoes’ as a possible source of inspiration. He eventually received the message loud and clear and here he adds an overwhelming formless magma of sounds, distorted chords, growling sounds that increase, until finale slowly shrinks with loops and soundscapes.

The first thing to compare Fractal Guitar with might easily be previous recordings by Sonar, for which the guitarist is the main composer as for his solo album. It is very different, if I am composing for Sonar, I know there will be no solos and no lead voice –he says. I am concerned with interplay and how the piece evolves. What I am interested now is a combination of writing and improvisation. It’s not completely improvisation and composed, it’s a mixture. There’s a lot more of that on ‘Fractal Guitar’, I wanted more solos, more that the individual musicians could have fun doing wild and daring things. Sonar is more organized, although it can and does get wild sometimes. While the band is proceeding more within a restricted set of self-imposed rules operating at moment of writing the music, which thing is part of their creative success, this time Stephan Thelen decided to steer in a different direction. If you write with a limited set of rules, it’s actually sometimes easier to get new ideas. If I am working with Sonar, I stick to those rules. It’s not ‘forbidden’ to write in 4/4 time, but rhythmically it will be more complex than that. For my solo album, the music is more textural. I am thinking what kind of sounds to use and which players could adapt to those sounds. For example, if I know I will be playing with Markus, I can write specifically for him

This time he is allowing himself to extend the effects to include delay and compression, effects that are so unusual in the usually dry-of-any-addition sound of SonarI used to play a lot with effects, 10 years ago -says Thelen. But coincidentally with Sonar, I concentrated on a pure and clean sound to focus more on composition and clear structures. For many years I just put effects away, but then I spoke with Markus and saw what he did with effects and loops. He is still bending them to serve same purposes of repetition he explores with his own band. I especially wanted to use an effect I worked with before Sonar, which I call ‘Fractal Guitar’ -a rhytmic delay with a very high feedback level that creates cascading delay patterns in odd time signatures such as 3/8, 5/8 or 7/8 -as he writes in the lines notes. While working with extended delay techniques has allowed guitar players to play by themselves alone, but has also forced them to stick to the expectedness of the 4/4 beat -take the 1975 manifesto of delay explorations made by Manuel Göttsching Inventions for Electric Guitar as an example, here Stephan Thelen plays with the machines in a different manner. Before Sonar I was playing with short delay that keeps going for a long time, those fractal like patterns. I used mainly delays, but I had also some samples and a granular synthesizer. The eponymous track Fractal Guitar starts with the Swiss guitarist playing against himself and setting the delay’s feedback to add unexpected odd patterns to the beat. This track most clearly demonstrates the “Fractal Guitar” technique. Here, the delay on the guitar is set so that a 5-note pattern is produced. That is set against a 9/8 pattern played by the rhythm section -as Thelen indicates in the track notes. Matt Tate‘s theme in the bass register is volatile and ambiguous and Benno Kaiser keeps two differently signed patterns in loop until accelerating at around three minutes and half. This pushes Markus Reuter forward to play a lacerated solo, followed, almost by contrast, by another one, this time made of very basic, yet thrilling, riff. But this is just momentary until the mood reverts to a quiet status, that allows Thelen to continue exploring colliding patterns.

Variation and exploring, it’s a philosophical thing. If you can’t accept repetition, you won’t like this music.

When discussing about the nature of rhythm, the semiotician Algirdas Greimas made a difference, between ‘simple expectation’ and ‘trusted expectation’. Even though he investigated rhythm in a broader sense, even outside the realm of music, the ‘simple expectation’ can be applied to what happens in a rhythmic cell when the beat alternates between sound and silence. This creates an energetic curve in the listening: we might think about the feeling of waiting, of expecting the next beat in a pattern. ‘Trusted expectation’, instead, plays in a different manner. The listener ‘believes’ (s)he can trust on the beat, can anticipate what the rhythm is producing, not only waiting for the next to come. This expectation plays on an higher level, creating a bond, a semiotic contractual agreement; the listener is part of the playing music. Roughly speaking, it does not play at rhythmic cell level, but at overall track/listening experience level. If this agreement is maintained -which might be translated with ‘if the listener perceives no break in the rhythm’- then the listener feels a sense of pleasure. Interestingly Thelen completely fits and at same time definitively disavows this definition. His patterns are repeating and each track in Fractal Guitar originates from a single pattern, exploding around it in a geometrical manner, like the picture of a fractal. This should maintain steady the perception of the rhythm. But, nevertheless, he is playing with the unexpected through a net of invisibly colliding patterns, that create a sense of permanent surprise in the listener. This allows a bond to be created, the listener to enter a feeling of deep listening, while still keeping a sense of focus and exploration.

know lot of musicians who categorically think that something which is repeated more than two or three times can not be good music -says Thelen. Variation and exploring, it’s a philosophical thing. If you can’t accept repetition, you won’t like this music. For me it was always clear: I love repetition and things that go on and on and on. By repeating something you create a sonic landscape or an atmosphere, so then you can concentrate on doing something on top of this landscape. Repetition is essential to create rhythm and it has been hugely embodied by ritual music. Keeping a continuous pattern going on allows the listener to uplift the focus from everyday things, to move to a ‘flow’ phase. This has been often linked with what happens in trance. I always liked this kind of trance music Thelen says, but it was never related with losing attention. It’s connected with the fact that you have a different set of mind, but not a set of mind you are not aware of. It has to do with being very attentive. Trance might sound like losing mind: if I listen to Steve Reich there are repeated things, but on the other hand I can feel every repetition in a different manner. It’s not like being spaced out, it’s not drug related. It’s the contrary, it’s being very perceptive, because of the small things that can change. It’s trance, but it’s trance with awareness.

The intersection of convoluted patterns and a wicked soundscape enriched with augmented and diminished notes at the start of Urban Nightscape puts the listener into a deep state of amplified awareness. The main theme of the track was originally written in 2003. This has then been released in various different versions, including on Thelen‘s 2008 solo String Geometry, which incidentally featured Benno Kaiser on drums as in the latest version. A bass pattern in 6 + 6 + 6 + 7 is added to a fast and ever-changing drum pattern, while the Fractal Guitar delay is in 5/8 -according to Stephan‘s notes again. The energy is at its highest when Torn adds his drilling, thumping, ripped guitar noises. David Torn is one of the most expressive guitarists, he can create such a dense emotional world -says the Swiss guitarist. We played with other good musicians, but hardly anybody that I know can be so experimental and the same time create that kind of emotion.. The interaction between the solos and the soundscapes by Markus Reuter reaches unparalleled levels of intensity, until coming back to the initial theme by Thelen and revealing the substance of it all, the rhythmic pattern that originated the entire track is based upon. 

Steve Reich deeply informed Stephan Thelen‘s approach to polyrhythmic patterns and repetition. While discussing the rhytmic approach of the minimalism master with Stephan, there’s one anecdote that is very interesting to quote. When Reich was once asked about Stravinsky, he pointed out that – compared with other conductors – he preferred the way the russian composer directed his own works. What is very interesting is that Reich enforces his argument by saying that, as a conductor, Stravinsky reaches the highest levels of emotion through an absolute control of time and pulse.. This interesting connection between absolute control of time and creating emotion might be reflected in Fractal Guitar: still Thelen goes beyond that. You have to be rhythmically 100% tight to release that emotion. I agree that rhythms must be played precisely –agrees Thelen. But on the other hand, for instance when we [Sonar] first played with David, there was a whole new world that he could bring to our music. We had our own rhythms of course, with which we could create emotional music, but if you have him on top that’s a new and different world of emotions. 

When I go to a concert I like to hear the ideas behind the actual music and how these ideas unfold and evolve over the course of time.

Stephan Thelen has a priviliged view also on the Swiss postminimal scene, having been linked with zen funk pianist Nik Bärtsch and with saxophonist Don Li. The connections with minimalism and Steve Reich are obvious, but the guitarist interestingly comments about what is difference between that American minimalism and this Swiss postminimalism: I remember one thing that Nik Bärtsch told me, that for him Steve Reich’s music is about pulse, not about groove. Groove opens up a whole new world of emotions which you can’t achieve with pulse. In the case of Sonar, we like to play a rhythm for an extended time period and let it grow tighter and tighter, denser and denser. On Fractal Guitar he applies a similar approach, discovering a world of emotion with Sonar as well in his solo album. Road Movie again originated from previous music material, as Thelen‘s notes tell the story behind the track: this was the first track that Markus played on in December 2015. His magnificent solo was recorded in Berlin and is on the first section of the piece. Manuel added his drumtracks in Benno’s studio in Aarau, Switzerland, on April 17, 2016. Bill and Henry added their tracks in Santa Cruz on April 27, 2016. Bill plays the solo in the middle section, Henry the solo at the end. Finally, Matt recorded his bass track on March 30, 2018 in Chicago. The main riff of the piece (an isorhythm in 27/8) was later used as the starting point for ‚Lookface!‘, a track from Sonar’s album Vortex. Creating tension that gradually shifts on and off through the various solos, until collapsing in a prolonged wall of sound finale, we feel the repetition increasing on and on until the emotion breaks at its highest point.

In 2016 Thelen wrote Circular Lines, a piece commissioned for Fifty for the Future: The Kronos Learning Repertoire by Kronos Quartet. Writing for classical ensemble is not new for him, since his repertoire already featured previous works adapted -notably Works for Piano played by pianist Viviana Galli– or composed for instruments or ensembles. I am currently writing a percussion piece for vibraphones, marimbas and organ – he indicates. I also wrote another string quartet for a possible future string quartet album. The influence of mimimalism is always relevant in his writing process, still he explores it from a different perspective: while it’s practically impossible to write for vibraphones and marimbas without quoting Steve Reich, the addition of an organ creates new possibilities. Whether pushing the boundaries of his guitar with or without effects, composing intricate and hypnotic polyrhythmic pieces, thrilling soundscapes or writing for classical ensembles, he still retains his vision behind that. When I go to a concert I like to hear the ideas behind the actual music and how these ideas unfold and evolve over the course of time. In other words, I’m always interested in a process that is based on a good and interesting idea which is presented in a very clear and transparent way. The idea itself can be very simple, but it should have the potential to create complex and interesting results. With Sonar we often very slowly build up a piece where one instrument starts and then others join in. In that way, you can clearly hear the elements of the piece slowly coming together. That’s something I always enjoy.

Stephan Thelen
Fractal Guitar

01 BRIEFING FOR A DESCENT INTO HELL (18:37)
David Torn: electric guitar, live looping
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Jon Durant: cloud guitar
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Manuel Pasquinelli: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal and tritone guitar

02 ROAD MOVIE (13:23)
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Bill Walker: electric guitar, live looping
Henry Kaiser: electric guitar
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Manuel Pasquinelli: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal and blue sky guitar, granular loops

03 FRACTAL GUITAR (9:21)
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Barry Cleveland: guitar atmospheres
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Andi Pupato: percussion
Benno Kaiser: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal guitar, granular loops

04 RADIANT DAY (8:42)
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Barry Cleveland: guitar atmospheres, bowhammer
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Manuel Pasquinelli: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal and blue sky guitar

05 URBAN NIGHTSCAPE (17:38)
David Torn: electric guitar, live looping
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Benno Kaiser: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal guitar, organ, samples

Produced by Markus Reuter & Stephan Thelen
Executive Producer: Leonardo Pavkovic for Moonjune Records

Versione in italiano

Una creatura che osserva la propria immagine, come una scimmia o un leopardo chini a dissetarsi da uno stagno, vede la materia danzare attraverso il tempo. Ma il soggetto che vede questa danza ha una memoria, un’aspettativa, e la memoria stessa é situata su un altro piano temporale. Così ciascuno di noi, che stia camminando, che stia seduto o che stia dormendo, contiene almeno due entità temporali diverse, avviluppate insieme come il tuorlo e il bianco dell’uovo (Doris Lessing, Discesa all’Inferno)

Attraverso il ritmo percepiamo la molteplicità del tempo. Due o più piani temporali in contemporanea, in un dialogo costante e senza fine, creano un ritmo che suscita un senso dilatato ed aumentato del tempo. La danza di Doris Lessing in Discesa all’Inferno, il romanzo sul viaggio allucinato fatto da un viaggiatore impazzito, è una storia di più ritmi. Mentre la narrazione si sviluppa, il sottotitolo libro diventa più chiaro, ovvero Discesa all’Inferno. Categoria: narrazione fantascientifica interiore, perché non c’è posto dove andare se non dentro se stessi. Il personaggio principale racconta l’incredibile storia di un viaggio, mentre è seduto nel letto di un manicomio, con flashback e flashforward che confondono e ingannano il senso del tempo del lettore. Stephan Thelen, che ha intitolato la traccia iniziale del suo album Fractal Guitar a questo romanzo, suona il tempo in maniera simile. Le metriche sovrapposte creano un arazzo frattale di intersezioni sinistre, aggiungendo strati su strati di figure ritmiche che collidono tra loro. Come il viandante nel libro, naviga attraverso paesaggi sonori costantemente increspati, fatti di schemi ripetitivi e di energia densa che creano un senso di veglia onirica.

Il chitarrista -e matematico- residente in Svizzera, ma Americano di nascita, ha trascorso l’ultimo decennio a far crescere il suo progetto Sonar insieme a Bernhard Wagner, Christian Kuntner e Manuel Pasquinelli. La band ha raggiunto un picco di riconoscimenti da parte della critica con Vortex e Live at Moods nello scorso anno. Entrambi hanno ospitato un quinto membro occasionale del calibro di David Torn. Al loro suono inconfondibile fatto di chitarre pulite accordate per tritoni, che si annodano su strutture ipnotiche e poliritmiche, si é aggiunto un nuovo musicista, capace di combinare il loro suono con la sua esclusiva gamma di tornado sonori. Questo ha aperto una nuova gamma di possibilità, una crescita esponenziale di nuove esplorazioni da intraprendere. La sua influenza è contagiosa perché ha una grande energia dal vivo  -sottolinea Thelen. Mentre la band si riunirà di nuovo quest’anno per registrare con la stessa formazione in ‘quattro più uno’, Stephan Thelen ha chiesto al chitarrista americano di partecipare al suo album solista Fractal Guitar, pubblicato con la MoonJune di Leonardo Pavkovic.

L’elenco degli ospiti si é arricchito di più musicisti, rendendolo un manifesto del chitarrismo d’avanguardia contemporaneo. La lista non è stata stabilita sin dall’inizio, ma è cresciuta man mano che il progetto si sviluppava: ho iniziato a pensare a Markus Reuter sin dall’inizio, perché abbiamo parlato in passato di fare qualcosa insieme – dice Thelen. Ho scritto alcuni pezzi che pensavo non fossero adatti per i Sonar ed ho pensato che Benno Kaiser potesse suonarci su. Markus, Benno e me siamo stati i primi musicisti a far parte del progetto. Stephan Thelen ha lavorato con la touch guitar di Markus Reuter in Falling for Ascension, pubblicato a nome dello stesso Reuter e dei Sonar. Guardando in retrospettiva, è piuttosto interessante osservare le diverse direzioni che la band ha assunto quando Reuter é stato il membro aggiuntivo e poi quando lo é stato Torn. Ma mentre Falling for Ascension ruotava attorno alla musica scritta dal solo Reuter, questa volta é stato Stephan Thelen ad aver composto il materiale. Tutto è iniziato con il batterista Benno Kaiser – un altro ex collaboratore di Thelen, hanno suonato insieme nei Radio Osaka e in precedenti lavori solisti del chitarrista – che ha prestato la sua batteria su una traccia e poi tutti e tre si sono scambiati via internet successive aggiunte. Era l’Agosto 2015 quando il progetto é iniziato e Stephan Thelen era appena tornato da un viaggio in Namibia (per coincidenza stava per andare nuovamente nello stesso paese alla fine del processo di registrazione nel Luglio 2018). Quando Benno non é stato più disponibile per le registrazioni, ho chiesto a Manual Pasquinelli, con cui suono nei Sonar, di registrare le tracce mancanti, ben sapendo che non avrebbe avuto difficoltà a suonarle. Poi sono andato in California, dove ho incontrato Henry Kaiser e Bill Walker e ho registrato le loro tracce a Santa Cruz – racconta Stephan Thelen. Ho conosciuto Jon Durant su Facebook e mi ha mandato uno dei suoi album. Ho pensato che sarebbe stato bello se avesse potuto suonarci anche lui. Ed, infine, per quanto riguarda Barry Cleveland, dopo averlo incontrato in California gli ho chiesto di aggiungere qualcosa su due tracce. E’ stato tutto molto spontaneo. Henry Kaiser è stato fondamentale per incontrare David Torn, che si è unito ai Sonar all’inizio con l’idea di suonare su poche tracce e, invece, ha finito per suonare su tutti i pezzi del futuro Vortex. E poi ha collaborato con Thelen anche per il suo album solista. Quando avevo quasi finito, sapevo che David sarebbe venuto in Svizzera e ho pensato a due pezzi su cui avrebbe potuto suonare. Abbiamo prenotato lo studio per una giornata e lui ha suonato i suoi soli e loops. Matt Tate ha aggiunto le ultime parti in una sera a Chicago. L’ultima cosa registrata appena prima del missaggio sono state le percussioni di Andi Pupato.

Sorretto dalla touch guitar a portare un tema piuttosto corposo, Briefing for a Descent into Hell è costruita attorno ad un pattern in 3 + 3 + 3, che Thelen sovrappone con altri pattern poliritmici in 5 o in altre misure dispari. Tuttavia la traccia mantiene un senso d’uniformità che la fa assomigliare ad un volo sospeso sopra la cima di una montagna. Mentre i primi due minuti vedono una moltiplicazione di pattern e riff che si alternano l’un l’altro andando a comporre l’atmosfera iniziale, non compare mai un vero e proprio tema principale, solo la moltiplicazione e la frattalizzazione del pattern principale. David Torn entra con suoni distorti e nitidi qua e là sul registro più alto, più per mettere in risalto la presenza del soundscape che staziona sul fondo della traccia che per proporre un tema principale. Gli strati inferiori del muro di suono crescono a mano a mano e vengono modificati da delays che dialogano con la sezione ritmica costruita attorno a Matt Tate alla touch guitar e Manuel Pasquinelli, il batterista, appunto, dei Sonar. Intorno agli otto minuti e trenta, arriva la prima pausa lasciando per pochi secondi un tappeto di corni sintetizzati, che cresce gradualmente  fino al primo assolo vero e proprio di Markus Reuter. La seconda pausa, immediatamente alla fine del solo, é per un riff che ricorda Frame by Frame dei King Crimson. Stephan Thelen, che ha studiato nel Guitar Craft Circle di Robert Fripp e non ha mai nascosto il suo apprezzamento per le strutture più articolate dei King Crimson come Fracture, è stato enormemente influenzato dal maestro britannico. Mentre nei Sonar ha mostrato il suo lato più ispirato dai King Crimson anni ’80 con le tipiche chitarre dal suono pulito, nei progetti a suono nome ha esplorato maggiormente l’effettistica e i soundscapes, che devono più, invece, al Fripp solista. Qui è come se trovasse un equilibrio tra due anime. E, tornando alla traccia, è di nuovo David Torn a prendere le redini del pezzo, rimettendo tutto in uno stato di frenesia, seppure una frenesia omogenea e quasi statica. Stephan Thelen ricorda la partecipazione di Torn: su questa traccia ho chiesto a David di “spingere sul manico della chitarra” come un chitarrista blues e persino di suonare l’assolo prendendo ad ispirazione il David Gilmour di “Echoes”. Torn ha ha accolto il suggerimento aggiungendo un magma destrutturato di suoni, accordi distorti, rumori graffianti che aumentano, fino a quando il finale lentamente si sgonfia tra loops e soundscapes.

Il primo confronto che Fractal Guitar fa venire in mente é quello con le precedenti registrazioni dei Sonar, anche perché il chitarrista figura come il principale compositore per la band, oltre che ovviamente per gli album a suo nome. È molto diverso, se sto componendo per Sonar, so che non ci saranno assoli e nessuna voce solista – dice Thelen. Sono interessato all’interazione e al modo in cui il pezzo si evolve. Quello che mi interessa è una combinazione di scrittura e improvvisazione nei Sonar. Non è tutto completamente improvvisato e composto, è una miscela. C’è molto di più in “Fractal Guitar”, volevo più assoli, volevo che i singoli musicisti potessero divertirsi a fare cose rischiose e prendersi dei rischi. I Sonar sono più organizzati, anche se a volte possono entrare in aree rischiose lo stesso. Mentre la band lavora più all’interno di un ristretto insieme di regole auto-imposte che vengono attivate al momento della scrittura, cosa che è alla base deol loro successo, questa volta Stephan Thelen ha deciso di orientarsi in una direzione diversa. Se scrivi con un insieme limitato di regole, a volte è più facile ottenere nuove idee. Se sto lavorando con i Sonar, rispetto queste regole. Non è “proibito” scrivere in 4/4, ma ritmicamente uscirà un risultato più complesso di un 4/4 standard. Per il mio album da solista, la musica è più materica. Penso a che tipo di suoni usare e a quali musicisti potrebbero adattarsi quei suoni. Per esempio, se so che suonerò con Markus, posso scrivere appositamente per lui.

Questa volta il chitarrista estende la sua pedaliera a compressore e delay, effetti insoliti nel suono solitamente grezzo dei Sonar. Suonavo molto con gli effetti 10 anni fa, -dice Thelen. Ma quando ho iniziato con i Sonar, mi sono convertito ad un suono puro e pulito per concentrarmi maggiormente sulla composizione e sul creare strutture rigorose. Ho messo via gli effetti solo per qualche anno, ma poi ho parlato con Markus e ho visto cosa faceva con effettistica e loop. Oggi piega gli effetti agli stessi scopi che segue con il suo gruppo, ovvero ad un uso estensivo della ripetizione. In particolare ero interessato ad usare un effetto con cui ho lavorato prima dei Sonar, che chiamo “Fractal Guitar”, un delay con un livello di feedback molto alto che crea pattern di ritardo a cascata in firme dispari come 3/8, 5/8 o 7/8 – come scrive nelle note dell’album. Mentre utilizzare il delay in maniera innovativa ha permesso ai chitarristi di suonare da soli, ma li ha anche costretti ad attenersi al 4/4 per seguire il beat -prendendo ad esempio il manifesto del delay fatto da Manuel Göttsching in Inventions for electric guitar del 1975-, qui Stephan Thelen suona le macchine in un modo diverso. Prima dei Sonar stavo suonando con un breve delay che dura molto tempo, creando dei modelli simili ai frattali. Ho usato principalmente delay, ma avevo anche alcuni samples e un sintetizzatore granulare. L’omonima traccia Fractal Guitar inizia con il chitarrista svizzero che suona sopra se stesso e imposta il feedback del delay per aggiungere pattern inaspettati. Questa traccia mostra chiaramente la tecnica della “chitarra frattale”. Qui, il delay della chitarra è impostato in modo che venga prodotto un pattern di 5 note. È impostato su un pattern in 9/8 riprodotto dalla sezione ritmica, come indica Thelen nelle note della traccia. Il tema di Matt Tate nel registro basso è volatile e ambiguo e Benno Kaiser mantiene in sequenza due pattern con due diverse metriche fino ad accelerare improvvisamente intorno ai tre minuti e mezzo. Questo spinge in superfice Markus Reuter con un assolo lacerato, seguito, quasi per contrasto, da un altro, questa volta fatto di riff molto semplice, ma emozionante. Ma questo è solo momentaneo finché l’atmosfera non ritorna alla quiete, con Thelen che continua ad esplorare temi in collisione fra loro.

Variazione ed esplorazione, è una faccenda filosofica. Se non puoi accettare la ripetizione, questa musica non ti piacerà.

Il semiotico Algirdas Greimas, specificando la natura del ritmo, ha distinto tra “attesa semplice” e “attesa fiduciaria”. Seppure all’interno di uno studio del ritmo intesto in un senso più ampio, anche al di fuori del competenze musicali, il concetto di “attesa semplice” può essere applicato a ciò che accade in una cellula ritmica quando il ritmo si alterna tra suono e silenzio. Questo crea una curva energetica nell’ascolto: potremmo pensare alla sensazione di attesa, di aspettative rispetto al prossimo battito in uno battuta. L'”attesa fiduciaria”, invece, funziona in modo diverso. L’ascoltatore “crede” di potersi fidare sul ritmo, di anticipare ciò che il ritmo sta producendo, non solo nell’attesa immediata di ciò che sta avvenire. Questa attesa gioca su un livello più alto, creando un legame, un contratto semiotico; l’ascoltatore fa parte della musica che suona. Semplificando, non suona a livello di cella ritmica, ma a livello di esperienza della singola traccia / dell’ascolto generale. Se si mantiene questo contratto – che potrebbe essere tradotto con “se l’ascoltatore non percepisce alcuna interruzione nel ritmo” – allora l’ascoltatore prova un senso di piacere. È interessante notare che Thelen si adatta perfettamente e allo stesso tempo devia in maniera netta da questa definizione. I suoi pattern si ripetono e ogni traccia in Fractal Guitar ha origine da una singola figura ritmica, esplodendo in maniera geometrica, come l’immagine di un frattale. Questo dovrebbe fare in modo che la percezione del ritmo rimanga costante. Tuttavia, Thelen suona l’inaspettato attraverso una rete di schemi che collidono in maniera invisibile, che creano un senso di sorpresa permanente nell’ascoltatore. Ciò permette di creare un legame, permette all’ascoltatore di entrare in una sensazione di ascolto profondo, pur mantenendo un senso di attenzione e di esplorazione.

Conosco molti musicisti che pensano categoricamente che una cosa che si ripeta più di due o tre volte non può essere una buona musica – dice Thelen. Variazione ed esplorazione, è una faccenda filosofica. Se non puoi accettare la ripetizione, questa musica non ti piacerà. Per me é sempre stato chiaro: amo la ripetizione e ciò che va avanti e continua, continua. Ripetendo qualcosa crei un paesaggio sonoro o un’atmosfera, quindi puoi concentrarti ad fare qualcos’altro in cima a questo paesaggio. La ripetizione è essenziale per creare il ritmo ed é una componente essenziale della musica rituale. Mantenere una figura ritmica costante consente all’ascoltatore di sollevare l’attenzione dalle cose di tutti i giorni, per passare a una fase di ‘flusso’. Questo è spesso collegato con ciò che accade nella trance. Mi è sempre piaciuta la musica trance, dice Thelen, ma mai nel senso di perdita della coscienza. È connesso con l’avere una prospettiva diversa, ma non un tipo di prospettiva in cui non sei consapevole. Ha a che fare con l’essere molto attento. La trance potrebbe sembrare una perdita di coscienza: se ascolto Steve Reich ci sono cose ripetute, ma d’altra parte riesco a sentire ogni ripetizione in un modo diverso. Non è come stare fuori, non è legato alla droga. È il contrario, è essere molto aperti alle percezioni, perchè le piccole cose possono cambiare. È trance, ma è trance con consapevolezza.

L’intersezione tra cellule ritmiche contorte e un paesaggio sonoro sinistro condito da estensioni aumentate e diminuite sugli accordi all’inizio di Urban Nightscape conduce ad uno stato profondo ed amplificato di consapevolezza interiore. Il tema principale della traccia è stato originariamente scritto nel 2003 e é già stato pubblicato in varie versioni, tra cui nell’album solista String Geometry del 2008. Qui figurava anche Benno Kaiser alla batteria, così come avviene in quest’ultima versione. Un pattern di basso in 6 + 6 + 6 + 7 viene aggiunto a uno di batteria dall’andamento veloce e in continua evoluzione, mentre il delay della ‘Fractal Guitar’ è in 5/8, secondo le note di Stephan Thelen. L’energia è al massimo quando Torn aggiunge i suoi rumori di chitarra perforanti, fragorosi e stagliuzzati. David Torn è uno dei chitarristi più espressivi che esistono, riesce a creare un mondo emotivo così denso – dice il chitarrista svizzero. Abbiamo suonato con altri bravi musicisti, ma difficilmente qualcuno che conosco può essere così sperimentale e allo stesso tempo creare quel tipo di emozione. L’interazione tra i soli e i paesaggi sonori di Markus Reuter raggiunge livelli di intensità senza precedenti, fino a che il tema iniziale di Thelen diminuisce d’intensità e scopre il pattern ritmico che ha dato origine all’intera traccia.

Steve Reich ha influenzato profondamente l’approccio di Stephan Thelen alla scrittura poliritmica e alla ripetizione. Discutendo con Thelen a proposito del maestro del minimalismo americano, esce fuori un aneddoto dalle implicazioni molto interessanti. Parlando della musica di Stravinsky, Reich diceva che preferiva il modo in cui il compositore russo dirigeva i propri lavori, anche rispetto ad altre direzioni più blasonate. E’ molto interessante che Reich rinforzi la sua argomentazione dicendo che, come direttore d’orchestra, Stravinsky raggiungeva i più alti livelli di emozione attraverso un controllo assoluto del tempo e del ritmo. Questa interessante connessione tra il controllo assoluto del tempo e la creazione di emozioni é una cartina di tornasola per quello che succede in Fractal Guitar: eppure Thelen va oltre. Devi essere serrato sul ritmo al 100% per liberare quest’emozione. Sono d’accordo sul fatto che i ritmi debbano essere suonati con precisione – concorda Thelen. D’altra parte, ad esempio, quando [noi Sonar] abbiamo suonato per la prima volta con David [Torn], c’era un mondo completamente nuovo che lui poteva portare alla nostra musica. Ovviamente avevamo i nostri ritmi, con i quali potevamo creare una musica emotiva, ma se poi hai lui sopra è un nuovo e diverso mondo di emozioni.

Quando vado a un concerto mi piace ascoltare le idee dietro la musica che sto ascolando e come queste idee si dispiegano e si evolvono nel corso del tempo.

Il chitarrista svizzero ha una visione privilegiata anche sulla scena postminima svizzera, collegata con il pianista zen funk Nik Bärtsch e con il sassofonista Don Li. Le connessioni con il minimalismo e Steve Reich sono ovvie, ma il chitarrista commenta in modo interessante la differenza tra quel minimalismo americano e questo postminimalismo svizzero: ricordo una cosa che mi ha detto Nik Bärtsch, che per lui la musica di Steve Reich é caratterizzata da pulsazioni, non dal groove. Il groove apre un nuovo mondo di emozioni che non è possibile raggiungere con le pulsazioni. Nel caso dei Sonar, ci piace suonare un ritmo per un lungo periodo di tempo e lasciarlo crescere sempre di più, in maniera via via più densa. Su Fractal Guitar applica un approccio simile, scoprendo quello stesso mondo di emozioni che esplora con i Sonar anche nel suo album solista. Road Movie ha di nuovo origine da materiale musicale composto in precedenza, come le note di Thelen raccontano: questa è stata la prima traccia che Markus ha suonato nel dicembre 2015. Il suo magnifico solo è stato registrato a Berlino ed è nella prima parte del pezzo. Manuel ha aggiunto le sue percussioni nello studio di Benno ad Aarau, in Svizzera, il 17 aprile 2016. Bill [Walker] e Henry [Kaiser] hanno aggiunto le loro tracce a Santa Cruz il 27 aprile 2016. Bill suona l’assolo nella sezione centrale, Henry l’assolo alla fine. Matt ha registrato la sua traccia di basso il 30 marzo 2018 a Chicago, alla fine. Il riff principale del pezzo (un isoritmo in 27/8) è stato successivamente utilizzato come punto di partenza per Lookface!, una traccia dall’album Vortex dei Sonar. Creando una tensione che gradualmente si accende e si spegne attraverso i vari soli, fino a crollare in un muro di suono prolungato, é possibile sentire la ripetizione che aumenta continuamente di intensità fino a raggiungere il punto più alto di emozione.

Nel 2016 Thelen ha scritto Circular Lines, un brano commissionato per Fifty for the Future: The Kronos Learning Repertoire del Kronos Quartet. Scrivere per un ensemble classico non è una cosa nuova per lui, dal momento che il suo repertorio include già lavori precedenti che sono stati adattati, ad esempio Works for Piano eseguito dalla pianista Viviana Galli, o composti per strumenti o ensemble. Attualmente sto scrivendo un pezzo di percussioni per vibrafoni, marimbas e organo – indica. Ho anche scritto un altro quartetto d’archi per un possibile futuro album di quartetti d’archi. L’influenza del mimalismo è sempre rilevante nel suo processo di scrittura, tuttavia lo esplora da una prospettiva diversa: mentre è praticamente impossibile scrivere per vibrafoni e marimbas senza citare Steve Reich, l’aggiunta di un organo crea nuove possibilità. Sia spingendo i confini della sua chitarra, utilizzano o meno gli effetti, sia componendo pezzi poliritmici intricati e ipnotici, paesaggi sonori da brivido o scrivendo per ensemble classici, conserva ben chiara la sua visione. Quando vado a un concerto mi piace ascoltare le idee dietro la musica che sto ascolando e come queste idee si dispiegano e si evolvono nel corso del tempo. In altre parole, sono sempre interessato a un processo basato su un’idea valida e interessante presentata in modo molto chiaro e trasparente. L’idea stessa può essere molto semplice, ma dovrebbe avere il potenziale di creare risultati complessi e interessanti. Con i Sonar spesso creiamo molto lentamente un pezzo in cui uno strumento inizia a guidare la musica e poi altri si uniscono. In questo modo, puoi sentire chiaramente gli elementi del pezzo che si uniscono in maniera graduale. È qualcosa che mi piace in qualunque momento.

Stephan Thelen
Fractal Guitar

01 BRIEFING FOR A DESCENT INTO HELL (18:37)
David Torn: electric guitar, live looping
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Jon Durant: cloud guitar
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Manuel Pasquinelli: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal and tritone guitar

02 ROAD MOVIE (13:23)
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Bill Walker: electric guitar, live looping
Henry Kaiser: electric guitar
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Manuel Pasquinelli: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal and blue sky guitar, granular loops

03 FRACTAL GUITAR (9:21)
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Barry Cleveland: guitar atmospheres
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Andi Pupato: percussion
Benno Kaiser: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal guitar, granular loops

04 RADIANT DAY (8:42)
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Barry Cleveland: guitar atmospheres, bowhammer
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Manuel Pasquinelli: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal and blue sky guitar

05 URBAN NIGHTSCAPE (17:38)
David Torn: electric guitar, live looping
Markus Reuter: U8 touch guitar, soundscapes
Matt Tate: U8 touch guitar (bass)
Benno Kaiser: drums
Stephan Thelen: fractal guitar, organ, samples

Produced by Markus Reuter & Stephan Thelen
Executive Producer: Leonardo Pavkovic for Moonjune Records

%d bloggers like this: