Tag: fusion

Raffaele Matta Trio – Sounds of Human Activities [2020]

By Marcello Nardi Mar 19, 2020 0

Raffaele Matta crafts a world of multiple influences, like jazz, fusion, Indian classical music, in Sounds of Human Activities, where his vision of a collective creation is still predominant. His style is clear, refined and his voice is very undistinguishable. Yet he always strives for playing music for the others and with the band in mind. The listener benefits from that, no matter the travel is fourteen or two minutes long. Still the music retains a ritual aspect, subly combined with the intensity of the moment, that catches the attention

Ghost Rhythms – Live At Yoshiwara [Cuneiform Records 2019]

By Marcello Nardi Dec 29, 2019 0

Live at Yoshiwara is like a kaleidoscope: simple, yet complicated; intuitive, yet brainy; rejoycing, yet haunting. Classical cadences, jazz brass energy, proggish breaks, afro and folk influences all cooperate around catchy melodies. The audience discovers new feats under the surface of every bar turning into another. A manifesto of non-existent places of music in the fictionary universe of Ghost Rhythms

Mark Wingfield and Gary Husband – Tor & Vale [MoonJune 2019]

By Marcello Nardi Nov 25, 2019 0

Guitarist Mark Wingfield and pianist Gary Husband put our perception of time on hold, and start navigating a free form land, embarking in an innermost quest into Time itself. Evoking the refined dialogues between John Abercrombie and Richie Beirach in Abercrombie‘s first quartet, or the intimate interchanges between Ralph Towner and John Taylor in Azimuth’s Depart, the two write a chapter of incredible beauty in their Tor & Vale. Feeling no constraint to go deeper and deeper, they make music for people who listen to time, by people who listen to time

Anton Eger – Æ [Edition Records, 2019]

By Marcello Nardi Feb 12, 2019 0

Æ is a displacement of a billion forces collapsing one on each other, heading in multiple and unique directions. When you might be tempted to call it chaotic, it becomes intensely pop, when disco synths take the lead, then the drummer adds an array of incredible odd measured patterns. Nothing is ever stable, but the work is definitively unique. Pointing in a direction where others are indicating as well, at the junction between electronic, jazz, progressive and math-rock, yet it proves to be really a one of a kind -genre-defying- listening experience

Antonio Sanchez – Lines in the Sand [CamJazz 2018]

By Marcello Nardi Dec 5, 2018 0

When in 2005 Pat Metheny Group released The Way Up, a monumental almost 70-minutes suite made of 4 tracks crossing so many genres that would be hardly filed only in the jazz label, it became an instant success and a recording appearing in most of the best-of-the-year lists. Summoning one of the best creative and pushing forward moments of the long-living band, it resulted a redefining footstep of how an unexpected epic narrative could be developed by a jazz artist. Looking back at the past, I personally felt like a bridge was made between my jazz and progressive rock listenings:… Continue reading

Mark Wingfield – Tales from the Dreaming City [MoonJune 2018]

By Marcello Nardi May 26, 2018 0

When in September 2012 Steve Vai showed up on Guitar World‘s cover along with emerging shredder Tosin Abasi, it seemed like he was trying to bring some fresh air. After the golden era of the ’80s and’ 90s, the electric guitar had – according to few- lost its charm, had less appeal on new generations, despite the explosion of many shredders on YouTube, it was – arguably- less innovative than the past. Yet the Italo-American shaman had no doubts: guitar would have been the instrument of the future. When listening to Mark Wingfield‘s Tales from the Dreaming City it is easy to… Continue reading