Francesco Diodati – Never the Same [Auand, 2019]

Francesco Diodati – Never the Same [Auand, 2019]

Feb 2, 2019 0 By Marcello Nardi
Italian version below

Paul Klee teaches us the power of assumption, of being able to draw multiple and flourishing consequences from a single element. We must not settle for only one solution, we must obtain a cascade, a tree of consequences (Pierre Boulez, Le Pays Fertile)

Sitting in a delightful January day with a coffee, in one of the few surprisingly quiet areas in Rome, while having a chat with guitarist Francesco Diodati, you might easily forget he’s just releasing a new album. Because you don’t even notice time is passing, while the conversation spans from Pierre Boulez to Steve Coleman, moving through contemporary art, deduction in the scientific research and sociological interpretations of the meaning of ‘youth’. And you might have lost why you were there while enjoying the pleasant chat. This is how it went our chat: yet, we discussed about the music in his latest recording, released under the name of Francesco Diodati Yellow Squeeds and entitled Never the Same, in every single moment, even when apparently off the table. There was always a red thread moving unseen through the words, which Francesco hinted when discussing about a documentary about CERN, the physics laboratory in Geneve. Science might go hand in hand with the intuitive beauty of art, as Diodati perfectly summarizes with the words those formulas which are correct, they have a mark of beauty in them. Researching might go together with writing music, he says and his music says.

Recognized as an experienced guitarist in the Italian scene with more than ten years experience, Francesco Diodati garnered an important reputation after the collaborations with renowed players and a bunch of highly exploratory albums at his own name. He has been linked with Italian trumpeter Enrico Rava, who joined since 2013, released an ECM album with and whose quartet is still playing with. He worked with Bobby Previte as well -notably they released the post-rock influenced Plutino together with saxophonist Beppe Scardino-, drummer Jim Black, trumpeter Paolo Fresu, trombonist Gianluca Petrella among the others. His investigative and boundary breaking guitar sound made of frequent clean or raw sounds, feedback and effects, post-rock arpeggios together with twisting Monk-influenced melodies have guaranteed him five straight wins by Jazzit magazine readers’ polls. He’s now releasing the second album together with Yellow Squeeds line-up, whose music he is main composer of, and they have all been published by Italian explorartory jazz label Auand. A quintet, yet not a quintet in the standard sense of the word, featuring trumpter Francesco Lento, Enrico Zanisi at piano and keyboards and Enrico Morello -fellow player also in Enrico Rava‘s quartet- at drums. The line-up is bass-less and it’s pivoting around the tuba sound provided by Glauco Benedetti: I met Glauco while recording with singer Ada Montellanico some time ago. He was  playing tuba on that recording. Then I happened to listen to bands with sousaphone in New York. I liked tuba, it created a totally different sound to mix with the acoustic piano. I liked the idea of managing elements of unexpectedness in my band. I did not have a specific band as reference, a precise source to take inspiration from. Of course some bands came to my mind, like Henry Threadgill who used tuba a lot, Liberty Ellmann used tuba, but I did not borrow my idea from them. Henry Threadgill‘s Very Very Circus and Zooid, with their typical twisting and exploding burts, are the closest references to Yellow Squeeds, including Bill Frisell‘s line-up heard on the classic Rambler -the american guitarist deeply nourished Diodati‘s playing. And multiple line-ups centered around tuba are drawing attention nowadays, notably Shabaka Hutchings‘s Sons of Kemet and Daniel Herskedal. Yet none is similar to them: Yellow Squeeds display a unique sense of humor, playfulness, aggressive sounds mixed with refined arrangements and polyrhytmic journeys. 

I care a lot about the kind of research I did on this work. Before writing something or thinking about how playing it, I studied polyrhythms for two years, until I was so accustomed with it to feel it literally inside my hands. Searching and learning are kind of recurring words in Diodati‘s vision. Whether we are speaking about how Pierre Boulez was influenced by what Paul Klee‘s wrote about his own deduction process or what Francesco learnt while playing in Myanmar -he has travelled frequently to the country as part of him joining Mynmar meets Europe project-, still he is focused on music as an act of learning. In the information age it might be easy to think learning ends when we found data we were looking for; yet we are missing an additional stage, which is developing an inner consciousness about what we’ve learnt. This is actually well-know in training industry -take a look at the Conscious Competent Ladder. When we learn by progressive additions of information, we will reach a stage where we are conscious of the skill we learnt. We know what we are capable of. Yet, the very final stage is becoming unconsciously skilled, which means being able to do something without really understanding why we can, because it seems to easy. (Try to reflect on exactly the movements you make while you are doing something you learnt in your childhood). Francesco Diodati is very aware of what it takes to reach that very final stage and how to do that from a musician’s perspective. Simple Lights, the middle of nine tracks on this album, is a declaratory example of how this process works for him: I studied dynamic polyrhythms with Miles Okazaki, something he had practiced with Steve Coleman. I took a note about and then I kept it unused for years. Then I found it again in 2015 and studied it for the subsequent two years. At the end of this process, I was finally able to apply the concept in one of the tracks in this new recording. What happened then is Diodati made that example a generative source for exploring and creating what then become Simple Lights. Stimulating curiosity, nourishing it with a wide array of inputs, even outside of music, this can trigger a multiplying approach. Something similar to what Boulez said about how painter Paul Klee conceived deduction as a tree of consequences. Whenever I start from a rule and I plan to do things in advance in a certain way –says the guitarist, it doesn’t work. I need to practice, to do a reasearch in the field, not just theorizing it. Something pushes me to get more in deep. And when I’m really into something, I am able to expand it. Maybe that’s the research: change and expansion.

Starting from a snakeing slide guitar and a singing melody over an afrobeat rhythm, Simple Lights not only inflames the expert and polyinstrumental playing provided by drummer Enrico Morello, yet elicits the powerful underlying bounces by Benedetti and the swinging additions by Lento. Steve Coleman is the ghost in town in this playful, dancing and intense track. Yet Diodati explores a different way to build its own rhythmic additions, differently than the master. When Enrico Zanisi adds his cubanesque piano in the higher layer imposed over a binary-against-ternary pattern, the ambiguity becomes crazy and confusing, until the delicious caribbean duo by Lento and Benedetti, occasionally at trombone. Yet the body can’t stop dancing, even if the clever modulations move through chromatic steps and keep a sense of weird melodic development. Through constant additions of rhythmic patterns, the track creates a unique sense of moving that is funny and aggressive at once. Diodati explains how he is interacting with the rest of the band: I like to show directions to the musicians I play with, but ultimately they are welcomed to endorse them in their very own way. I don’t like a musician playing by the script. This bothers me a lot, it doesn’t sound like music. Music is a living thing. Even if it’s overwritten, the score must aim at letting people be able to put themselves in. I really care about it in each band I am owner of or I am bringing my own vision of music in.

Premiered during a tour that went through London, Milan’s JAZZMI festival, Amsterdam’s Bimhuis and an usual location for them, Rome’s Casa del Jazz, Never the Same showed how improved their sound grew at the release of their sophomore effort. The quartet shows a tighter connection, a deeper sense of interaction that lets no time to take a breath. Simple Lights is a perfect example of this work in progress, as Diodati explains: that track shows how the band dynamics evolved. Some rhythms overlap on each other, then the track progresses and the shifting beats are apparently pushing things we listened before back in the surface. It’s like turning over an object and seeing it from a different perspective, spotting a color you had not seen before. This allows me to research, even in action during a live setting, because we never expect to play the same time as we did before. The purpose of my writing is to achieve things like this. Just playing according to the score is not enough. 

Dancing on the stage, I want to get up there. A time when I am not concerned about performing something in a fixed way

The opening Here and There is divided in two parts, the first centered around a funky riff interacting with a rhythmic line swaying and ondulating through binary and ternary rhythmic patterns. Lento‘s trumpet plays a juicy riff mainly in unison with Diodati, with the guitarist at times stopping on oddly centered start and stops that are remindful of both Tigran Hamasyan odd-meters and of Meshuggah hard edged riffs.  The guitarist has a deep taste for extended melodies and places them often over long chord progressions and intricate rhythmic patterns: still they are always catchy and he never fails to lose the sense of melodic development. Here and There‘s second theme starting at approx. four minutes is overstrucured as well as the initial theme: while in the first part tuba, piano and drums seemed to be in background, they slowly emerge powerful and intense with a math-rock flavor. Francesco Diodati indicates how he wrote it: the second part of the track is based on polyrhythmic layers. A cloud of rhythm is placed over a basic pulse, it is like the throttle moves up and down. Removing the underlying pulse and leaving only the polyrhythm would result in time accelerating and decelerating. Both the two-beats and three-beat pulses are written according to polyrhythmic patterns. When I write the polyrhythmic layers in this way, I might place the stroke on five sixteenths or five eights groupings. You just feel a sort of time slowing down, if you remove the pulse. But ultimately it accelerates in a way related to a different pulse, placed on the underlying layer. I am interested in playing on one beat or the other as to create a sense of ambiguity in the song. 

There are hints at post-rock or electronic influences in the rhythmic and tone debaucheries Yellow Squeeds put in place. Diodati frequently makes use of tones rich of feedback, additions of soft fuzzes to his clean sound, which is often very raw in Never the Same: I increasingly explored this style of sound lately -the guitarist says. I chose a Fender Jaguar, which has a raw sound, a surf music guitar with an harsh style. It’s very risky to play with this kind of sound, because it’s so different than that typical mid frequencies oriented jazzy sound. […] At one point I felt the need to remove everything and just feel the string, listening to the instrument attack, being able to feel the imperfection of the note. And then starting back building my own sound from that. I usually add fuzz, delay on it. Those effect are part of a basic sound, a very earthy sound. Nonetheless, Francesco Diodati‘s style pays a due to players such as Jim Hall and Bill Frisell. The latter, widely known for his open airy style chords, is inspiring his playing also from a rhythmic exploration point of view: [Frisell] manages polyphony in a very peculiar way, yet he explored rhythmic side in a very interesting manner. Even if this is not the first he is usually linked with, just because he has this amazing airy, expanded sound. Yet, he is incredibly clever in his rhythmic choices.

When it comes to speak about influences, the short interlude Blue Dreams unfolds how much he was exposed and studied with one of the most underrated guitarist around, Marc Ducret. An intricate and oblique solo on acoustic, that from a certain point of view marks a break in the rhythmic craziness of the album. Still the lesson from the master is learnt at a deeper and unconscious level, speaking the language of training formulas, as Diodati shows how to bend Ducret‘s style in his own playing with a mark of authenticity. When talking about lessons learned from Marc Ducret -he was accidentally coming off a conversation with the french guitarist just few days before our chat- and, again, Steve Coleman, he makes clearer how his own writing process works: Lennie Tristano and Stravinsky were sources of inspiration for Marc Ducret. […] I remember a conversation I had with Steve Coleman. I asked him about how he developed a pattern. He told me that he did nothing, but taking the music of Charle Parker and Thelonius Monk, going in there and expanding the concepts that were already kept into their music. Listening to Monk you realize that, even in those tracks moving according to a four against four beat, yet they are based on polyrhythmic patterns. Even if you dig into the more popular themes created by Monk, you’ll discover a world ready to be expanded, as Coleman did. Marc Ducret does something similar when drawing inspiration from Stravinsky or Tristano.

Irrational Numbers perfectly delivers the sense of this expanding concept. Piano’s ethnic flavored intro is answered by a tonally ambiguous counterpoint by guitar -again an hint at Ducret is just behind the curtain. An hidden rhythmic pattern drives the track and trumpet together with drums add a new layer. And finally that same pattern comes back some bars away, now with just part of the former notes. Through an engrossing crescendo, Diodati adds crunchy chords and vigorous lead guitar breaks rich of feedback, Zanisi displays fast-breaking lines while the others travel seamlessly through the multiple layers of rhythms like an expanding and exploding supernova. After around three minutes and fifty seconds the full band is now able to release a full force blowing-away riff at the pinnacle of the tension.

If Irrational Numbers is one of the most dynamic efforts of the album, then the title track starts with a more reflective mood. Over a tonally swifting and rhytmically sparse accompaniement by Enrico Zanisi‘s piano that reminds a sort of Radiohead‘s Pyramid Song sense of eerie stasis, Francesco Diodati places occasional notes until the lyrical entrance by Francesco Lento. The guitarist tells more about Never the Same came from: I turned the recorder on, I played and then I transcribed it. I just wanted not to worry about a specific metric or rhythmic beat, just playing the chords as long as I liked to. And this is what came out. It was initially a very different song. It was the hardest track to record in studio, we haven’t played it live yet. The first part, with that chord progression moving beneath the surface and we improvising over it in a very minimalistic manner, was initially different. It was all rhythmic and very precise. But we played it and I did not like it. I slowly nurtured the idea of trying it this way just before recording it with the band. Since the entrance of an elusive cymbal beat, the rhythmic pattern becomes clearer until a break at around three minutes. The second part retains same rhythmic contrasts, yet propelled by a rhythmically clever solo by Enrico Zanisi at synths until an intricated closing theme.There a specific rhythm driving this song, but it’s not really clear. Enrico Zanisi plays an ostinato on the bass register. It is beautiful because everything is just alluded, there is this flowing magma with a deep rhythm thsat gradually evolves. The idea for final theme came later, when I got back on that piece. I wrote it two years ago. I had not planned to record it for this line-up. A few months before the record I totally modified it and then we recorded it.

I care a lot about the kind of research I did on this work. Before writing something , I studied polyrhythms for two years, until I was so accustomed with it to feel it literally inside my hands

Dancing, sleek and eye-catching, the tuba intro by Benedetti in Cities (formerly named after the city of Ferrara) shows how Yellow Squeeds managed a balance between ironical and more clever arrangements -see the odd-metered funky melody by LentoI like working in band whose sound needs to be created from scratch -says Diodati. Sometimes it’s a fight. In this case I should not be creating something that works with double bass, we have to create, instead, for tuba. We need to keep in mind that tuba does not have the same attack double bass has. This is interesting to me, because it pushes me to write in a way that I would usually not. That’s research as well!  The rhythmic sections morphs into an aggressive garage rock while trumpet and guitar joyously dialogue. Dancing on the stage, I want to get up there –says Diodati, a time when I am not concerned about performing something in a fixed way. It needs to go step by step down to a route to reach towards this. You should be wanting to do this thing like nothing else, which also allows you to eventually stop playing, to play silence. It often happens to me lately to step aside, to let the band play, to feel like it is to listen to them and then to come back, in a very harsh manner. We play like this with Francesco Lento very often: sometimes Francesco comes back in even if my solo is not over and his solo has not started yet. I like this, because it is like reaching a stage when we are free together, yet with a deep sense of awareness.

Yellow Squeeds are shifting ahead their level of interaction, with an unique voice between those bands reinventing post-rock influences within jazz realm, bringing innovation at harmonic and rhythmic level. The band shows a deeper level of interaction, yet retaining the different sides of the musicians: I am looking for putting myself in a state of listening to the others – he says. I no longer have the need to express myself and to make evidence I need to protect my own ground. Being open to others is like playing a game, a risky game of course, because it depends on whom you play with. If the musicians do not accept those rules, if I sense someone is side stepping, I’m going to bother, to trigger a reaction from that musician. That’s what I want from those I play with. It’s something that I feel more important now than in the past. It is part of the beauty of playing. The audience can feel the difference when that kind of energy is created.

Francesco Diodati is genuinely putting the research within his music, disguising it over a layer of singing melodies, groovy riffs and sharping guitar strummings. He is currently focused on multiple adventures: playing with Enrico Rava, soon in an extended line-up that will include pianist Giovanni Guidi and trombonist Gianluca Petrella; writing lyrics and songs for his Blackline trio with drummer Stefano Tamborrino and singer Leila Martial; playing with Floors trio with bassist Francesco Ponticelli and trombonist Filippo Vignato; hailing the 10 years annyversary of MAT trio, together with saxophonist Marcello Alluli and drummer Ermanno Baron; joining again Matteo Bortone’s Travellers band. And there are also projects involving dancers, visual artists on the horizon. Research is something that includes everything. Researching means watching a move, reading a book, playing guitar. Even if I was not a musician, I would be still researching. Research means having a dinner out with a friend. Research means falling in love!

Francesco Diodati
Never the Same

01 Here and There
02 Cities
03 Irrational Numbers
04 River
05 Simple Lights
06 Blue Dreams
07 Entanglement
08 Never The Same
09 Expanded Straight No Chas

Personnel

Francesco Diodati guitar
Francesco Lento trumpet
Enrico Zanisi piano, Fender Rhodes, synths
Glauco Benedetti tuba, valve trombone, flute
Enrico Morello drums, gongs

Recording Data

Produced by Francesco Diodati, Marco Valente
Executive Producer: Marco Valente
Recorded at Groove Farm, Roma – Italy
Engineer: Stefano Del Vecchio, Roberto Lioli
Cover Photo: Sara Bernabucci
Auand

Versione in italiano

Paul Klee ci insegna la potenza della deduzione, a poter trarre , partendo da un unico soggetto, conseguenze molteplici, che proliferano. È assolutamente insufficiente appagarsi di un’unica soluzione, bisogna ottenere una cascata, un albero di conseguenze (Pierre Boulez, Il Paese Fertile)

Ritrovarsi in una deliziosa giornata di gennaio davanti ad un caffè, in una delle poche zone inaspettatamente tranquille di Roma, a chiacchierare con Francesco Diodati, e scordarsi che il chitarrista romano sta per pubblicare un nuovo album. Perché non ci si accorge del tempo che passa, mentre la conversazione va da Pierre Boulez a Steve Coleman, passando dall’arte contemporanea, alla deduzione nella ricerca scientifica e a cosa significa il termine “giovane”. E ci si dimentica il motivo dell’incontro mentre la conversazione scorre piacevole. Così è andata: ci siamo ritrovati a parlare della musica nel suo ultimo album, pubblicato sotto il nome di Francesco Diodati Yellow Squeeds e intitolato Never the Same, anche quando apparentemente non se stavamo parlando. Un filo rosso ha attraversato tutta la chiacchierata, soprattutto quando siamo arrivati a parlare del documentario dedicato al CERN, il mega laboratorio di fisica di Ginevra, intitolato Il Senso della Bellezza. Un documentario in cui si parla di scienza, ma anche di come la scienza potrebbe andare di pari passo con la bellezza intuitiva dell’arte. Diodati sintetizza perfettamente questo connubbio ideale con le parole: le formule che funzionano sono le formule belle. Le formule e la ricerca possono avere una loro un loro valore artistico, questo é quello che Francesco Diodati e la sua musica dicono.

Uno dei chitarristi più esperti sulla scena jazz italiana, con più di dieci anni di esperienza, Francesco Diodati si é guadagnato una reputazione sia grazie alle sue collaborazioni che ad una serie di album a suo nome caratterizzati da una forte vena esplorativa. Con il trombettista Enrico Rava ha pubblicato un album con ECM dopo essere entrato nel suo quartetto nel 2013 e esserne tuttora membro. Ha anche collaborato con il batterista Bobby Previte – da ricordare un interessante equilibrio tra post-rock e jazz nell’album Plutino registrato insieme al batterista americano e al sassofonista Beppe Scardino. Eppoi con un altro batterista d’avanguardia come Jim Black, con il trombettista Paolo Fresu e con il trombonista Gianluca Petrella, tra gli altri. La sua chitarra si esprime con suoni clean, ma anche grezzi, spesso con feedback e un uso pensato dell’effettistica, con arpeggi post-rock insieme a intrecci di melodie dal sapore monkiano. Tutto questo gli ha garantito la nomina, per molti anni consecutivi, come miglior chitarrista da parte dei lettori del magazine Jazzit. Ora pubblica il secondo album insieme agli Yellow Squeeds, di cui è il principale compositore. Tutti e due gli album sono stati pubblicati dall’etichetta pugliese Auand. Un quintetto, ma non propriamente un quintetto nel senso comune del termine, con il trombettista Francesco Lento, Enrico Zanisi al pianoforte e tastiere e Enrico Morello – anche lui nel quartetto di Enrico Rava – alla batteria. La line-up è senza basso e ruota attorno alla tuba di Glauco Benedetti: ho conosciuto Glauco mentre facevamo un disco con Ada Montellanico dove c’’era lui alla tuba. Poi ho ascoltato a New York dei gruppi con il sousafono. È lì che m’é m’é piaciuta la tuba, uno strumento capace di creare un suono totalmente diverso, che poi ho mischiato con il piano acustico. La cosa che mi piace è avere una strumentazione tale da non potermi appigliare a niente. Non ho un riferimento vero e proprio a cui ispirarmi. Ho magari dei gruppi, come quelli di Henry Threadgill, che ha usato molto la tuba, o Liberty Ellmann. Però non ho preso ispirazione direttamente da loro. Henry Threadgill con le formazioni Very Very Circus e Zooid e le loro tipiche esplosioni improvvise, sono i riferimenti più vicini a Yellow Squeeds; magari anche la formazione di Bill Frisell sul classico Rambler – il chitarrista americano ha profondamente influenzato il modo di suonare di Diodati. E ci sono molte formazioni che stanno riscoprendo il ruolo di questo strumento sulla scena attuale. Vengono in mente i Sons of Kemet di Shabaka Hutchings e Daniel Herskedal. Eppure nessuno è simile: gli Yellow Squeeds mostrano un senso dell’umorismo unico, giocosità, suoni aggressivi mescolati con arrangiamenti raffinati e incursioni poliritmiche.

C’é un tipo di ricerca che sento molto dentro a questo lavoro. Prima di pensare a come fare un pezzo o ideare un certo modo di suonare, per due anni ho studiato la poliritmia per interiorizzarla, finchè non è diventata una cosa che stava dentro le mani. Ricercare ed imparare sono parole ricorrenti quando Diodati parla della sua musica. Sia che si parli di come Pierre Boulez sia stato influenzato dalle parole di Paul Klee a proposito del processo di deduzione o di cosa abbia imparato Francesco suonando in Myanmar -ha viaggiato spesso nel paese come parte del progetto Myanmar meets Europe-, tutto é sempre incentrato sulla musica come momento di apprendimento. Nell’era dell’informazione potrebbe essere facile pensare che l’apprendimento finisca quando si trovano i dati che si cercano; tuttavia manca uno stadio aggiuntivo, che sta nell’interiorizzare ciò che si impara. E’ una cosa ben nota nella formazione: ad esempio nella Conscious Competent Ladder, una scala di apprendimento utilizzata dai formatori, che indica i passaggi per arrivare ad interiorizzare una competenza. Quando apprendiamo una qualunque cosa attraverso aggiunte progressive di informazioni, raggiungeremo uno stadio in cui siamo consapevoli delle competenze che abbiamo appreso. Sappiamo di cosa siamo capaci. Eppure, lo stadio finale sta ancora oltre, nel diventare inconscapevolmente capaci, cioè essere in grado di fare qualcosa senza capire veramente perché possiamo farlo, perché ormai la sappiamo fare talmente bene che ci sembra facile. Francesco Diodati è molto consapevole di ciò che serve per raggiungere questo stadio e di come farlo dal punto di vista di un musicista. Simple Lights, che fa da spartiacque nel mezzo delle nove tracce dell’album, è un esempio perfetto di come questo processo funzioni per lui: un giorno Miles Okazaki mi parlò di poliritmie dinamiche, una cosa che aveva approfondito con Steve Coleman. Io mi sono preso questo appunto e poi per anni l’ho lasciato sepolto. L’ho ripreso nel 2015 mettendo a posto le cose, e mi son messo a studiare per 2 anni per arrivare ad un pezzo sul disco nuovo concepito in quel modo lì. Con estrema consapevolezza Diodati ha reso quell’esempio una fonte generativa per esplorare e creare ciò che poi sarebbe diventato Simple Lights. Stimolando la curiosità, nutrendola con input anche al di fuori della musica, si innesca un approccio moltiplicativo. Qualcosa di simile a quello che ha detto Boulez a proposito di come Paul Klee concepisse la deduzione come un albero di conseguenze. Fin che so dell’esistenza di una cosa e mi metto lì a tavolino a costruire il pezzo –dice il chitarrista, per me non funziona perchè diventa una cosa astratta. C’è stata tutta una prassi di ricerca che poi mi ha portato a concepire una cosa e non una concezione astratta. C’è un qualcosa che mi stimola e cerco di entrarci dentro. E quando c’entro dentro, allora posso iniziare ad espanderla. Forse questa é la ricerca. Trasformazione ed espansione.

Iniziando con una slide guitar dall’andamento serpeggiante e una melodia sinuosa su un ritmo afrobeat, Simple Lights non solo accende l’esecuzione del batterista Enrico Morello, ma spinge allo scoperto anche Benedetti, che tira fuori una linea di tuba rimbalzante, e Lento, che aggiunge preziosi frammenti. Steve Coleman sembra fare l’occhiolino da dietro il sipario in questo brano giocoso, danzante e intenso. Eppure Diodati esplora un modo diverso di costruire le proprie stratificazioni ritmiche rispetto al maestro. Quando Enrico Zanisi aggiunge un pianoforte dal sapore cubano nello strato superiore, il ritmo è contrastato tra binario e ternario e l’ambiguità diventa folle e confusa. Fino a che non si arriva al delizioso duo caraibico tra Lento e Benedetti, per una volta al trombone. Tuttavia non é possibile smettere di ballare, anche se le modulazioni intelligenti si muovono attraverso passaggi cromatici e mantengono uno sviluppo melodico difficilmente prevedibile. Attraverso costanti aggiunte di pattern ritmici, la traccia crea un senso unico di movimento che è divertente e aggressivo allo stesso tempo. Diodati spiega come interagisce con il resto della band: mi piace dare spunti che poi ogni musicista può riutilizzare per partecipare in modo attivo. Non mi piace che un musicista suoni bene la sua parte e basta, è un cosa che mi annoia, che non mi da il senso della musica. Per me la musica è una componente viva. Quindi anche se c’è molta scrittura, deve essere una scrittura finalizzata a metterci qualcosa di proprio. E questa è una cosa a cui tengo molto, in qualsiasi gruppo mio o collettivo o comunque in cui ho possibilità di esprimere un mio modo di pensare la musica.

L’album è stato presentato in anteprima durante un tour che ha attraversato Londra, Milano (durante il festival JAZZMI), Amsterdam (presso la prestigiosa Bimhuis) e Roma in un luogo abituale per la band, ovvero la Casa del Jazz. In queste date, Never the Same ha mostrato come il loro sound sia cresciuto in occasione di questo secondo lavoro. Una connessione più stretta all’interno del quintetto, un senso di interazione più profondo che non lascia il tempo di respirare. Simple Lights è un perfetto esempio di questo work in progress, come spiega Diodatiin quel pezzo c’é tutta un’evoluzione rispetto a questa [dinamica del gruppo]. Ci sono dei ritmi che sappiamo si intersecano, dopodichè  il pezzo si evolve, per cui lo spostamento degli accenti su l’uno o l’altro ritmo é come se prendesse quello che c’era prima e lo facesse riemergere in un modo diverso. O come se si rivoltasse un oggetto e si vedesse che c’é una prospettiva diversa, un colore che non si era visto. Per me diventa un momento di ricerca, anche sul campo, nel momento in cui andiamo a suonare questo pezzo dal vivo, perché non sarà mai lo stesso pezzo. Quello che faccio é scrivere per raggiungere questo. Per me l’esecuzione della partitura così com’è non basta.

Voglio arrivare a un punto in cui mi metto a ballare sul palco, un punto in cui non ho paura di dover eseguire un brano in un modo preciso

L’iniziale Here and There è divisa in due parti: la prima si muove attorno a un riff funky che interagisce con una linea ritmica, che ondeggia attraverso pattern ritmici binari e ternari. La tromba di Lento suona un delizioso riff all’unisono con Diodati, con il chitarrista che a volte si mette in disparte con stop e ripartenze che ricordano sia le metriche dispari di Tigran Hamasyan che i riff della band heavy metal Meshuggah. Il chitarrista ha un profondo gusto per le melodie prolugnate e le colloca spesso su lunghe progressioni di accordi e intricati schemi ritmici. Tuttavia rimangono sempre orecchiabili e non perdono mai il senso di sviluppo melodico. Il secondo tema di Here and There parte dopo circa quattro minuti ed è sovrastrutturato come il tema iniziale: mentre nella prima parte, tuba, pianoforte e batteria sembravano in sottofondo, lentamente emergono potenti e intensi con un sound da math rock. Francesco Diodati indica come ha scritto la traccia: la seconda parte é tutta su strati poliritmici. C’é una pulsazione di base e sopra si crea come una nuvola di ritmo, che é come se accelerasse e decelerasse. Se si toglie la pulsazione sotto e si lascia solamente la poliritmia sopra, è come se si stesse su un altro tempo che accelera e decelera. Ci sono poliritmie sia sulla scansione binaria e sia sulla scansione ternaria. Nel momento in cui scrivo le poliritmie in questa maniera, vado ad accentare a gruppi di cinque sedicesimi piuttosto che cinque ottavi. E’ chiaro che se si toglie la pulsazione sotto, sopra rimane una sorta di tempo che rallenta e accelera, anche se in un modo totalmente relazionato ad un’altra pulsazione sottostante. Anche li mi interessa giocare tra queste cose, stare sull’uno o l’altro battito e creare tutta questa ambiguità nel pezzo.

Ci sono accenni al post-rock e all’elettronica contemporanea nelle ritmiche e timbriche della band. Diodati usa suoni ricchi di feedback, o magari aggiunge un pò di fuzz al suo suono pulito, che è spesso molto grezzo in Never the Sameé una cosa verso la quale mi son sempre più diretto negli ultimi anni –dice il chitarrista. Anche nella scelta della chitarra, una Fender Jaguar, con un suono più rude, una chitarra da surf music, dal suono grezzo. E’ un suono molto rischioso, perché nel jazz quel tipo di suono é spesso più caratterizzata da toni chiusi. […] Ad un certo punto ho avuto l’esigenza di togliere tutto e sentire la corda, sentire l’attacco, sentire l’imperfezione. E su quello ripartire. Poi su questo ci metto il fuzz, il delay. Però diventano tutti parte di un suono di base che é invece più terroso. Nondimeno, lo stile di Francesco Diodati è debitore delle lezioni di Jim Hall e Bill Frisell. Quest’ultimo ha uno stile connotato da accordi aperti ed ariosi, ma ispira il modo di suonare del chitarrista romano anche da un altro punto di vista: [Frisell] ha la polifonia, ma ritmicamente é molto interessante. Anche se non è la prima cosa che si pensa, perchè ha questo suono arioso, espanso. Invece ha un’intelligenza ritmica che io trovo fenomenale.

Quando si parla di influenze, il breve interludio Blue Dreams mostra quanto abbia ascoltato e studiato con uno dei chitarristi più sottovalutati in circolazione, ovvero Marc Ducret. Un solo intricato e obliquo sull’acustica, che da un certo punto di vista segna una pausa nella frenesia ritmica dell’album. Anche in questo caso la lezione del maestro viene appresa a un livello più profondo e inconscio, parlando la lingua della formazione, dato che Diodati mostra come piegare lo stile di Ducret al suo modo di suonare con un segno di autenticità. Parlando delle lezioni apprese da Steve ColemanMarc Ducret –  pochi giorni prima della nostra chiacchierata i due si era giusto scambiati alcune mail -, si capisce come funzioni il processo compositivo di Diodati: Marc Ducret si ispira a musica molto diversa, da Lennie Tristano a Stravinsky. […] Mi ricordo una conversazione con Steve Coleman. Ad un certo punto gli ho chiesto come gli fosse venuto in mente un determinato passaggio. Lui mi disse che non aveva fatto altro che prendere la musica di Charle Parker e Thelonius Monk, andarci dentro ed espandere i concetti che erano già nelle loro musiche. Ed in effetti andando ad ascoltare Monk si trova che, anche nei pezzi in quattro quarti, ci sono poliritmie. Anche i temi apparentemente più banali di Monk spesso hanno delle caratteristiche che, provando ad esplicitarle, permettono di scoprire un mondo da poter espandere, come ha fatto Coleman. Marc Ducret fa lo stesso quando prende ispirazione da Stravinsky o Tristano.

Irrational Numbers è il perfetto esempio di questo concetto di espansione. L’intro di piano dal sapore etnico è accompagnata da un contrappunto tonalmente ambiguo della chitarra – anche qui un riferimento a Ducret è evidente. Un pattern ritmico nascosto guida la traccia e la tromba, insieme alla batteria, che aggiunge un nuovo strato. E finalmente quello stesso pattern ritorna dopo qualche battuta, stavolta con una parte delle note originarie. Attraverso un crescendo avvincente, Diodati aggiunge accordi spigolosi e pause al suo solo, giocando con il feedback del suono. Zanisi snocciola linee veloci mentre gli altri viaggiano senza interruzioni attraverso i molteplici livelli di ritmi, come una supernova in espansione pronta ad esplodere. Dopo circa tre minuti e cinquanta secondi, l’intera band è ora in grado di far scoppiare un riff in piena forza nel momento di massima tensione.

Se Irrational Numbers è uno dei momenti più dinamici dell’album, la title track, invece, crea inizialmente uno stato d’animo più quieto. Sostenuta da un accompagnamento del pianoforte di Enrico Zanisi, che svicola attraverso molteplici riferimenti tonali e piazza gli accordi in maniera quasi sparsa dal punto di vista della scansione ritmica, in Never the Same ci ritroviamo in una sorta di stasi dal senso inquietante, che ricorda Pyramid Song dei Radiohead. Francesco Diodati aggiunge  la sua chitarra in maniera sporadica, fino all’ingresso ricco di lirismo di Francesco Lento. Il chitarrista racconta di più su Never the Same: ho acceso il registratore, ho suonato e poi mi sono trascritto. L’unica idea alla base era di non preoccuparmi di una particolare metrica o ritmo, semplicemente suonare gli accordi finchè mi piaceva suonarli ed è uscita fuori questa traccia. All’inizio era completamente diversa. E’ stato il pezzo più difficile da registrare in studio, dal vivo ancora non l’abbiamo suonata. Tutta la prima parte, con quell’armonia sotto e noi che improvvisiamo sopra in maniera molto rarefatta, era inizialmente diversa. Era tutto ritmico e scansionato. Però, lo suonavamo e io sentivo che non mi piaceva. Da lì piano piano mi é venuta l’idea, provandola con loro prima della registrazione, di suonarla in questa maniera. Dall’ingresso di un ritmo mutevole dei piatti della batteria, il pattern ritmico diventa più chiaro fino a una pausa intorno circa ai tre minuti. La seconda parte mantiene gli stessi contrasti, ma é stavolta spinta da un assolo ritmicamente intelligente di Enrico Zanisi ai synth, fino ad arrivare alla chiusura affidata ad un tema intricato. In questa versione c’è un tempo, ma non si capisce bene bene. Enrico Zanisi continua a suonare sotto con l’ostinato. E’ bello perchè non c’è un’esplicitazione, ma c’è, invece, questo magma. C’è un flusso ritmico, che si evolve. Il tema finale è venuto dopo, quando mi sono rimesso su quel pezzo. L’avevo composto due anni fa e inizialmente non l’avevo concepito per questo gruppo. Prima del disco, qualche mese prima, l’ho completamente trasformato e l’abbiamo registrato.

C’é un tipo di ricerca che sento molto dentro a questo lavoro. Prima di pensare a come fare un pezzo o ideare un certo modo di suonare, per due anni ho studiato la poliritmia per interiorizzarla, finchè non è diventata una cosa che stava dentro le mani.

Danzante, agile e accattivante, l’intro tuba di Benedetti in Cities (brano originariamente intitolato alla città di Ferrara prima della registrazione) mostra come gli Yellow Squeeds siano riusciti a trovare un equilibrio tra arrangiamenti ironici e intelligenti, come nella melodia dalle tinte funky di Lento. Mi piace avere un organico in cui mi devo inventare un suono di gruppo -dice Diodati. A volte é uno scontro, non é come scrivere per il contrabbasso. Qui ci dobbiamo invece inventare una cosa che funziona con la tuba, che non ha lo stesso attacco. Questo mi affascina, perchè mi porta a scrivere in un modo in cui normalmente non scriverei. E’ ricerca pure questa!  Le sezioni ritmiche si trasformano in un garage rock aggressivo, mentre la tromba e la chitarra dialogano gioiosamente. Voglio arrivare a un punto in cui mi metto a ballare sul palco -dice, un punto in cui non ho paura di dover eseguire un brano in un modo preciso. Che come dire é riuscire ogni volta a fare un passo in più per andare verso questa consapevolezza. Deve essere la cosa che desideri fare di più in quel momento. Questo permette anche il non suonare, permette di utilizzare il silenzio. Ultimamente mi capita spesso di farmi da parte, di far suonare il gruppo. Di sentire da fuori e rientrare, anche in modo estremo. Lo facciamo molto con Francesco Lento: certe volte Francesco rientra anche se non é finito il mio solo e magari non é iniziato il suo. Questo mi piace, perchè è un tipo di libertà che è unita ad una profonda consapevolezza. 

L’interazione all’interno degli Yellow Squeeds si sta spingendo in avanti, raggiungendo una voce unica tra quelle band che stanno reinventando le influenze post-rock nel jazz, spingendo l’innovazione a livello armonico e ritmico. La band riesce a mantenere le individualità dei musicisti: è bello arrivare a quel punto perchè sostanzialmente riesci a metterti in uno stato di ascolto degli altri –spiega Francesco. Non hai più quella urgenza di dover esprimerti e far sentire che é il tuo momento. Rispetto anche agli altri. Diventa un gioco, un gioco chiaramente rischiosissimo perché dipende da le persone con cui suoni. Se l’altro musicista in quel momento non accetta quelle regole, se sento che c’è un musicista che si sta tenendo in disparte, vado a suonargli addosso perché è questo quello che voglio dai musicisti con cui suono. È una cosa che sento più importante rispetto al passato. Per me diventa questa la bellezza del suonare. Secondo me si sente da fuori la differenza quando questa energia si crea. 

Francesco Diodati sta mettendo la ricerca al servizio della sua musica mascherandola sotto uno strato di melodie piacevoli, riff ricchi di groove e graffianti strumming di chitarra. Oggi è focalizzato su molteplici avventure: suonare con Enrico Rava -presto in una formazione allargata che comprenderà il pianista Giovanni Guidi e il trombonista Gianluca Petrella; scrivere testi e canzoni per il suo trio Blackline con il batterista Stefano Tamborrino e la cantante Leila Martial; suonare con il trio collettivo Floors insieme al bassista Francesco Ponticelli e al trombonista Filippo Vignato; portare in live i 10 anni del trio MAT con il sassofonista Marcello Alluli e il batterista Ermanno Baron; registrare di nuovo insieme a Matteo Bortone e alla sua band Travelers. E ci sono anche progetti nella danza e nelle arti visive all’orizzonte. La ricerca è una cosa che investe tutto. Per me la ricerca é guardare un film, leggere un libro, studiare la chitarra. Ho un approccio alla ricerca da musicista, ma, anche se non lo fossi, avrei lo stesso approccio. E’ ricerca anche andare a cena con un amico. E’ ricerca innamorarsi!

Francesco Diodati
Never the Same

01 Here and There
02 Cities
03 Irrational Numbers
04 River
05 Simple Lights
06 Blue Dreams
07 Entanglement
08 Never The Same
09 Expanded Straight No Chas

Personnel

Francesco Diodati guitar
Francesco Lento trumpet
Enrico Zanisi piano, Fender Rhodes, synths
Glauco Benedetti tuba, valve trombone, flute
Enrico Morello drums, gongs

Recording Data

Produced by Francesco Diodati, Marco Valente
Executive Producer: Marco Valente
Recorded at Groove Farm, Roma – Italy
Engineer: Stefano Del Vecchio, Roberto Lioli
Cover Photo: Sara Bernabucci
Auand

%d bloggers like this: